Milestone Blog

Lead Like a President (No Politics Necessary)

Posted by Milestone Leadership on Jul 3, 2019 11:08:38 AM

As we celebrate our nation’s independence, it brings to mind the kinds of leaders who helped to create and sustain the ideals of the United States of America. Political parties and individuals who rise in influence through the processes of our democracy can be extremely polarizing, yet it is important to remember that leadership of a place so vast, diverse and powerful as our nation is an unimaginably complex and Herculean task.

The tone of good leadership and consistent actions to reinforce it must come from the highest levels of any organization—but these qualities are relevant to all of us, regardless of our personal or professional roles. Here are six quotes from past United States Presidents that are as true now as the day they were spoken, and serve inspiration for qualities of leadership to which we should all aspire:

1) "It's amazing what you can accomplish if you do not care who gets the credit." - Harry S. Truman

The power of not taking credit is often underestimated. When leaders and peers openly take joy in the accomplishments of others and demonstrate the satisfaction of seeing team members achieve goals or spark innovation, the results can be highly motivating within an organization. People want to work harder when they know they are appreciated and the value of their contributions are celebrated.

2) "The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today." - Franklin D. Roosevelt

Constant self-doubt can quickly derail leadership. It’s important to recognize that while self-awareness and ongoing evaluation of how we’re doing is key to growth as leaders, it is equally important to remember that rising to a place of leadership comes about because of recognized capabilities and skills. Make informed decisions and take actions with confidence, look for peers to offer validation, and reflect occasionally on past successes that might have once seemed unattainable.

3) "If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader." - John Quincy Adams

When a leader gives others the chance to dream, they are offering team members the power to determine how tomorrow can be better. Aspirational thinking generates fresh solutions, new products, improved services and a healthier work environment. Encouraging others to learn more shows a belief in the value of knowledge and the impact of personal and professional growth—which in turn builds loyalty and confidence. Leaders who inspire others to do more are delegators who are ultimately communicating the belief that their teams are competent, productive and meet high standards. Team members who are guided to become more are able to grow in their abilities and talents, benefiting themselves and the organization as a whole.

4) “Do what you can, with what you have, where you are.” - Theodore Roosevelt

Successful leaders are able to assess and capitalize upon what they do have, rather than focus only on what they need. Regardless of resources, time and circumstances, there are always ways to make an impact at any stage of an organization’s lifecycle. The best leaders look for how to take the current state to the next level, ultimately growing in strength, improving the status quo and earning increased resources over time.

5) “There are men and women who make the world better just by being the kind of people they are. They have the gift of kindness or courage or loyalty or integrity. It really matters very little whether they are behind the wheel of a truck or running a business or bringing up a family. They teach the truth by living it.” - James Garfield 

Leaders exist in every role or capacity and have the potential to influence and inspire others. Living one’s values through steady, consistent actions and words is powerful. It is important to not only cultivate and exhibit our own gifts in ways that support others, but to also recognize the capabilities and contributions of others—no matter where they may be.

6) "Whenever you do a thing, act as if all the world were watching." - Thomas Jefferson

We never know who we may inspire and encourage, or who we may disappoint and disillusion. The strongest leaders understand that every action has consequences and we are solely responsible for the attitudes and actions we perpetuate. Leading with kindness and unwavering ethics will never fail a person, even in the face of difficulty or crisis.

Our team at Milestone Leadership has the honor of growing and guiding leaders worth following, and we are inspired every day by the actions and accomplishments of those we serve. We know it’s not necessary to be at the very top of an organization—or a nation—to make an impact.

What is at the heart of great leadership is just that: HEART.

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Topics: Professional Development, Productivity, Growth, Initiative, Living Your Values, Motivation, Employee Engagement, Leadership, Honesty, Candidness, Tone at the Top, Advice, Management, Empowerment, Effectiveness, Reflection, Values, Feedback, Boss, Organization, Company Culture, Tips, innovation, Emotional Leadership, Success, Organizational Change, Intentionality, Workplace, Teams, Change Management, Milestone, Sacrifice, Team Health, Heart, Vision, Change, Problem Solving, Legacy, High Performance, Bravery, Aspirations, High Performing Teams, Dreams, Courage, Challenge, Strategy, Learning, Powerful Influencers, Relationships, Values & Ethics, Practical Tips & Tricks, Employee Development, Personal Development, Creating Culture, Leader Worth Following, Communication, Affirmation, Service

Leaders in the Trenches: Unexpected Influencers

Posted by Milestone Leadership on Jun 27, 2019 10:15:00 AM

Sometimes the most influential leaders step up not because position demands it, but because it’s the right thing to do even when the path ahead is foggy and feelings of uncertainty about how to proceed are intense. On occasions when a person unexpectedly comes forward to do more than is required, it can reveal his or her true capabilities and worth. Leading during crisis or upheaval takes commitment, flexibility and heart—and the outcome can mean big wins for the organization, as well as individual team members.

“Not long ago, I was working as an associate on a team that was enormously impacted by a major organizational transition and realignment. Our group significantly decreased in size, we lost our manager and had no direction or strategy for how to move forward in the new reality. Needless to say, the situation was scary and very uncomfortable. We all well understood that the financial stakes were really high, but our group felt completely lost and disconnected.

“At a point when we were feeling especially insecure, one of our accounts receivable analysts, Wayne Johnson, stepped forward to say he would be willing to volunteer to assist the team. An individual contributor without a team of his own, Wayne said he would be happy to stand in temporarily as someone to report to if anything was needed. His ultimate actions and commitment to the team, however, resulted in a much greater impact than we initially expected.

“Wayne took it upon himself to deep dive into our processes and figure out what needed to be done within our new organizational climate. Recognizing our roles were evolving and had to adjust to meet the changing needs of the business, he tested and reshaped our processes multiple times according to what was required, as well as what felt correct for the wellbeing of the business and our customers. His influence ensured we were able to keep things moving correctly.

“Yet, as much as he helped keep our team on track during an uncertain time, Wayne’s influence actually had a much larger impact on me personally. He recognized I was determined to learn and trusted me to take ownership in my role and run with it, all the while pushing me to expand my abilities and improve where I could do – and be – better. His consistent actions, unwavering encouragement and gentle guidance allowed me to be successful and gain visibility. My resulting growth and development led to my receiving a promotion.

“Wayne’s own drive and determination, combined with his openness, honesty and servant leadership mindset is inspiring. He pushed me to participate in more activities, resulting my pursuit of a graduate degree and participation in a Milestone Leadership experience. Both endeavors opened my eyes to the possibilities of how I, too, can lead. Having recently completed my MBA, I have been reflecting back on what helped me achieve this monumental goal. Wayne’s leadership and dedication to helping others to grow to their desired potential is at the pit of the fire that fueled my success.

When I see Wayne, I always try to thank him for the opportunities and drive he gave me. He would say, ‘It’s all you…you did the work,” but I know his kind insistence that I could achieve more really made the difference. I know now that leadership is a mindset, not just a position. I’m actively looking for ways I can make a difference, offer solutions and be the kind of inspiration Wayne has been for me.”

Melanie Suber, MBA—Lead Business Analyst – Post Audit, Genpact

At Milestone Leadership, experience tells us that anyone can step up as a leader, whether they hold the title on an org chart or not. Here are some ways to be a leader worth following, even if you’re not the one “in charge:”

  1. Look for gaps in processes or procedures that, if resolved or improved, could make everyone’s jobs easier. Take the initiative to suggest changes and help communicate or clarify what comes next.
  2. Be observant of where coworkers are struggling or feeling overwhelmed, and offer assistance. Don’t wait until a situation is critical; offer a hand.
  3. Set the tone for how you want team members to feel and behave toward you and each other. Establish a personal reputation for being welcoming, responsive and encouraging—and work to reinforce that same behavior within your group.
  4. Look for tasks that may be overlooked or going undone because others say, “That’s not my job.” Step in to carry a bit of extra weight when appropriate, even if it’s not explicitly spelled out in your job description.
  5. Pull up out of the weeds and look into the future. Rather than focus every moment on the to-do list for today, regularly consider and talk about what is ahead and develop an attitude of optimism and vision.
  6. Think beyond yourself and only what concerns you. Envision what is best for everyone and work to implement it. What’s good for the group will ultimately benefit each individual.
  7. Teach others. If you know how to do something well, share the wealth and improve your team’s overall capabilities by expanding the knowledge of your peers.
  8. Give credit and offer praise where it’s due. Not only acknowledge to a peer that you’ve noticed their achievement or great work—also take the time to tell their manager.
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Topics: Women in Leadership, Determination, Professional Development, Productivity, Growth, Initiative, Candor, Living Your Values, Motivation, Employee Engagement, Leadership, Honesty, Candidness, Tone at the Top, Advice, Management, Empowerment, Effectiveness, Reflection, Values, Feedback, Boss, Organization, Company Culture, Tips, innovation, Emotional Leadership, Success, Organizational Change, Intentionality, Workplace, Teams, Change Management, Milestone, Sacrifice, Team Health, Heart, Vision, Change, Problem Solving, Legacy, High Performance, Bravery, Aspirations, High Performing Teams, Dreams, Courage, Challenge, Strategy, Criticism, Learning, Powerful Influencers, Relationships, Values & Ethics, Practical Tips & Tricks, Employee Development, Personal Development, Creating Culture, Leader Worth Following, Communication, Affirmation, Service

Unvacationing: Don't Lead by Example

Posted by Milestone Leadership on Mar 14, 2019 11:55:46 AM

 

You started dreaming more than a year ago. You read a ton of blogs and began planning the perfect vacation. You saved up and then secured all the travel arrangements. You packed for every possible scenario.

You’ve arrived in your version of paradise, and the accommodations you booked are just what you’d hoped. You’ve scouted the perfect restaurants and excursions to enjoy. Everything is just what you anticipated—maybe even better—and you’re so ready to truly relax so it can all sink in….

EXCEPT YOU DON’T.

You check work email. You look at your phone again and again, making sure more texts aren’t coming in from your department. You promise yourself you’ll keep your responses short and only when necessary—but back at the office, because they saw you responded even when your out-of-office reply said you were unavailable, you’ve clearly indicated things are still “game on” for you. And the emails don’t let up. A few voice messages trickle in, usually starting something like, “Heyyyyy, I know you’re on vacation, BUT…” 

How do you feel when you read this? Does this sound too familiar, perhaps your own behavior or something you see regularly from your team members?

There is ever-growing scientific evidence indicating preoccupation with work and the inability to unplug is detrimental to productivity. Pushing ourselves constantly to do one more (and one more) task, to send just a few more emails, and to make a couple of last quick calls until we don’t remember where the time went…ultimately causes our brains to rebel against us. We find our usual creativity to be lacking, our quick thinking to have slowed and words start to escape us. We become irritable and listless, distracted and more easily frustrated.

According to a report by the U.S. Travel Association’s Project: Time Off Coalition’s report “The Tethered Vacation,” only 27% of U.S. employees actually unplug from work during their vacations and 78% say they are more comfortable taking time off if they know they can access work. More than a fourth of employees say they check back in hourly or several times a day. Employees who maintain more frequent contact with the office during vacation generally fear work will pile up and no one else can handle their responsibilities—and the fear of taking time off only increases as they advance professionally. Fifty-one percent of those who check in frequently report stress in their home life, compared to the 36% who actually unplug on vacation. Those stress levels ramp up substantially more at work.

Organizations have the ability to create cultures that support unplugging, and the benefits are very real. The fact is that employees in supportive environments are significantly more engaged. 69% feel valued for their contributions, 64% feel their employer cares for them as a person inside and outside of the office, and 73% feel their jobs are important to the company’s mission. Engaged employees who are able to unplug on vacation are the same ones who are willing to put in the extra time later under tough deadlines or when a project necessitates.

As a leader, you may wonder how much you can truly influence the culture of your organization when it comes to unplugging.  Research cited in “The Tethered Vacation” indicates managers and their behaviors have an enormous influence over direct reports’ time—actually more than their own families. The fact is that managers who don’t disconnect when on vacation (86%) are frequently putting pressure on direct reports to do the same. In the end, the push for continuous productivity and constant connection ultimately results in an opposite effect: employees who feel their leader places pressure on them to stay connected to work are generally less likely to be truly engaged. In other words, they’re present…but they’re not really there. And not only are they not really there, 40% of employees in unsupportive cultures are planning or already looking for new jobs.

Leaders worth following set the tone within their organizations. When leaders actively model behaviors they expect to see in team members and establish rules of engagement that benefit everyone, the outcome is overwhelmingly positive. Through proactive planning and shared responsibility, it is possible to establish work environments that allow all employees the opportunity to take time needed to recharge and refresh—and in so doing actually increase productivity while building loyalty.

Time to dust off that passport and turn off those mobile phone notifications for a few days—be the change!

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Topics: Professional Development, Unplug, Technology, Growth, Balance, Living Your Values, Employee Engagement, Leadership, Advice, Fun, Empowerment, Effectiveness, Reflection, Values, Organization, Company Culture, Success, Intentionality, Experience, Workplace, Burnout, Teams, Milestone, Truth, Team Health, Change, Top Down Leadership, Team Dysfunction, High Performance, Dsyfunction, Role Models, Learning, Relationships, Values & Ethics, Personal Development, Creating Culture, Leader Worth Following, Vacation

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